Thursday, June 22, 2006

WHO WE WANT AS CUSTOMERS AND TRAINERS

The opening of the new box is well on the way. Equipment is being ordered, schedules are being tested and people are inquiring about working for me.

One very popular instructor contacted me about working for me. She looked at the standards and felt she could not complete half of the physical requirements. She suggested that personality and charisma should have a higher status for my staff. The following is my response. It outline the basic philisophical differenct between what we do and what everyone else does.

Please keep in mind that I very much like and respect her and hope she come along to our way of thinking since we will not compromise our standards.

Dear A:

Interesting comments. I really need to clarify my position on training.

My observations of "group exercise" is that it is almost entirely driven by charismatic instructors (80% personality, 20% content) and it lacks quality content. The focus is on personality and beats per minute and resembles country line dancing resulting in a common theme of easy adaptation to the programming and therefore limited results. Another issue is how few men participate in the group classes. I was recalled for 7 months. I observed that all the women who were doing the typical aerobics, (Step, body sculpt and yoga) nothing changed for them. They were having fun dancing around to the same sorority music after 7 seven months with no visible results. (Asses the same size with no appreciable change in "body tone.")

It leads me to some conclusions:
1. Most fitness consumers are not really interested in results (Why would they be a part of programs that fail miserably?)
2. The typical fitness consumer does not value their fitness (Why would they accept lack of results? The entitlement attitude that they should get everything included in their membership for $40 per month when dinner and drinks is $200 for an evening)
3. Generally consumers who are uneducated are willing to accept inferior products (Does this need comment?)

So, do I pander to fads? Do I hire people because they are popular? Absolutely not. In fact, the more popular the would-be instructors are, the less likely I would be interested in working with them. When I started Boot Camp, people would say: It is too hard. I don't like his music. They do too many squats. Squats are bad for your knees, etc and so forth. I decided to lead and provide people with a results-oriented option. You have some buy-in because you have copied elements and brought them to Liberty without being compensated for it.

The key difference is leadership. What we do is harder than any other class around. We added CrossFit to the mix because it is unparalleled in results. Not because it is popular and not because it was in Vogue magazine and I hope it never is, but because it gets results. We provide people leadership in fitness. Most of the training we do is retro back to the days when people moved there bodies in functional ways and got tired doing it. College teams do stadium runs because they know it gets their players in shape enough to prepare their season.

Let me define the Hyperfit USA Customer:

1. People who are results driven. Period, end of story.
2. People who can recognize the value of their fitness and health.
3. People who can tell the difference between a part-time and professional instructor.
4. People who can value the above points and pay a premium price for exceptional instruction.

How big is this market? I don't care. We have created a market of serious people who want serious results who expend real efforts. It did not exist in Ann Arbor until we started over four years ago. The market is now growing and everyone is calling what they do as Boot Camp or Elite Fitness or High Intensity Training and it resembles body building supersets or station-based interval training. I wish I had not called my class Boot Camp. It causes so much confusion in the mind of the customer. When I hear "I do Boot Camp at..." it make me cringe that people would lump me into that group.

People pay premium prices for premium service. It costs a lot to travel and seek the best training available. Our customers understand that they have the option to go to the Washtenaw County Rec Center for less then $150 per year. You will also note that the instructors who teach there also teach at all the fitness clubs in the area. What we provide is expert training in areas that they need and cannot get on their own or from a selectorized machine or the young kid in the personal trainer polo shirt.

This leads me to the "Charismatic Instructor." If the consumer is educated, then charisma is not so much a concern. They come for the coaching and expertise. You can't be a piece of wood but by no means to you need to be Billy Blanks. The ideal shift is now 70% content and 30% personality) How is this achieved? Training, training and training. The instructors must constantly achieve perfect execution of all exercise and be able to communicate those skills to the clients. The instructors must have a real commitment to excellence and constant study. Showing the customer a glimpses of what they can become and supporting them at every step of the way is really what matters. It also matters that you have something good to teach.

The main issue with charismatic instructors is that they are lacking in content and variety. Their programming is limited based on their format. Our format is that there is no format. Everything is variable to the point of randomness. The idea of a popularity contest is exactly what I want to breed out of my staff. It would be nearly impossible to have a purely content driven class but it is not impossible. We are going to get as close as humanly possible.

Let's face it, if "traditional" group exercise worked, then the military would adopt it and use it to train their people to prepare them for the greatest contest know to man: War.

I reissue a challenge: If you can show me fitter people, show us. We will train with them.

Are you still interested in working for me? :)


Doug

27 comments:

ec said...

i like the response doug.

ive been finding how challenging it is to get people just to come check us out - even "athletes". how did result based fitness programs become so unpopular?

anyway - perhaps youll come to boston in october?

Doug Chapman said...

EC,

Thanks - I was on a rate and ran with it.

Boston in October is possible, if Neal will have me?

Doug

Jerry Hill said...

Doug,
You are on a roll brother!
Great stuff!

Doug Chapman said...

Thanks Jerry.

I hope all is well in PA.

Doug

ec said...

neal would def be stoked if you came out.

Raymee said...

Wow Doug, you may have just single-handedly offended every charismatic group fitness instructor in cyberspace. I sure would be willing to bet that a nice little chunk of your CrossFit clientele have been referred by popular instructors such as my good friend A... CrossFit thrives on the graduates of our 20% content, results lackin' boot scootin' boogie. Hey man, how about a shout out to the gals with the big personalities who send their own people your way? As fitness professionals, we do realize that a client who limits him or herself to taking group fit classes as the only mode of training is probably not going to come out of it two months later with a six pack. But believe it or not, the folks you have quoted as "not really interested in results" may not necessarily be interested in the six pack. Results are relative to the goal, and the goal of a Charismatic Group Fitness Instructor is to provide a FUN, SAFE, and (oh my god) sometimes even CHALLENGING workout experience. Our students leave feeling happy, invigorated, and with a sense of accomplishment. We define that as delivering results. Thank you for acknowleging that your market is a small, elite percentage of the population. You have a unique product and an elite niche. I respect what you do for the men and women (even kids) who want what you define as "results", but please do not disparage those of us who deliver the many many other benefits of group fitness.

Doug Chapman said...

Rayme,

Thanks for posting. I thought very few actually read my rantings.

Offence is not my intention. My goal was, is and will continue to be to differentiate what Hyperfit USA does from the rest of the industry. The weakness of a business model that relies on the personality is apparent. For instance, what happens to most classes when the instructor is gone? Attendance diminishes.

I took the first 12 days of this month off from my classes. (I was very worried about diminishing attendance.) There was a modest decrease due to weather but for the most part, attendance did not suffer. The comments from my participants was what great workouts they did.

Another instance of the reverse is when our good friend stopped teaching at #*$*%&#*, her classes disappeared. The next instructor taught the same format, but no one came to the classes. So, were people going to class for the workout or the personality?

What are the results given and how are they measured? We do not focus on the appearance of fitness, but in actual human output. A "six pack" is not what we are doing. It is a byproduct but is not the measure of effectiveness. We teach people to move better. We time, measure and rank EVERY workout. We judge the workout based on the output of the participants. In my opinion, this is the greatest contribution of CrossFit to our training. It provides an OBJECTIVE standard to evaluate performance.

Take a close look at the photos on the blog. You will not find supermen and women. You will find a lot of really normal people doing extraordinary workouts.

We are severely limited at the current facility. A lot of the training we have been unable to do.

I do apologize if you found my letter disparaging. I think of an exercise continuum. On one side is a couch, the other is sports. Where someone falls on the scale is a matter of choice.

Until you drink the Kool-Aid, you will never know. You have an open invitation.

Please read the post about CrossFit standards.

Doug Chapman said...

Rayme,

Thanks for posting. I thought very few actually read my rantings.

Offence is not my intention. My goal was, is and will continue to be to differentiate what Hyperfit USA does from the rest of the industry. The weakness of a business model that relies on the personality is apparent. For instance, what happens to most classes when the instructor is gone? Attendance diminishes.

I took the first 12 days of this month off from my classes. (I was very worried about diminishing attendance.) There was a modest decrease due to weather but for the most part, attendance did not suffer. The comments from my participants was what great workouts they did.

Another instance of the reverse is when our good friend stopped teaching at #*$*%&#*, her classes disappeared. The next instructor taught the same format, but no one came to the classes. So, were people going to class for the workout or the personality?

What are the results given and how are they measured? We do not focus on the appearance of fitness, but in actual human output. A "six pack" is not what we are doing. It is a byproduct but is not the measure of effectiveness. We teach people to move better. We time, measure and rank EVERY workout. We judge the workout based on the output of the participants. In my opinion, this is the greatest contribution of CrossFit to our training. It provides an OBJECTIVE standard to evaluate performance.

Take a close look at the photos on the blog. You will not find supermen and women. You will find a lot of really normal people doing extraordinary workouts.

We are severely limited at the current facility. A lot of the training we have been unable to do.

I do apologize if you found my letter disparaging. I think of an exercise continuum. On one side is a couch, the other is sports. Where someone falls on the scale is a matter of choice.

Until you drink the Kool-Aid, you will never know. You have an open invitation.

another instructor said...

First, I am certain that since you "very much like and respect" 'A', you had her ok to print this personal email. As a fellow military member, I am certain that you would not have otherwise done something that would have been so self-serving and lacking in integrity.

If you chose to remove this post, perhaps good taste will lead you to remove your own as well?

As to the content of your rant (your words - no?)please let ME define the Hyperfit USA owner to whom I was introduced in the email to 'A'

1. You are somewhat prone to self-serving sweeping generalizations.
2. You demonstrate a certain lack of respect for your potential clients.
3. You have a confirmed lack of respect for group fitness instructors (and personal trainers),who are nationally accredited and committed to providing a SAFE, well-organized variety of movements.
4.You define part-time and professional as mutually exclusive - odd at best.
5. You have benefited from those of us ('A' in particular) who have steered our more elite participants to your classes yet you show your appreciation by denigrating our programs.
6. Here's where we are in complete agreement: "It makes me cringe" too "that people would lump ME into your group because I value the diversity that all of our programs can offer the fitness consumer. Yours is but one on a large continuum, and you might benefit from realizing that.
7. Perhaps you would consider changing your company name from HyperFit to HyperBole?? Just a thought.
I hope that posting your private email response to 'A' was but a poorly thought out action on your part - something that we all do from time to time? something that perhaps you would be willing to re-think?

Doug Chapman said...

First, posters should use their names. Integrity would require a name. Since I liked your critism, I will answer it.

Second: I don't remove posts. Part of the system is to be open to critism. The harder we scrutize our actions, the better product in the end.

On your points.

1. Generalizations are bad. Concur. I observed the behaviors. Is is science? Did I observe all classes? No. Have I seen enough to make some generalizations, yup.
2. Do not concur. I have the highest standards of performance and execution for my clientele. Please note in my class today, I had former NHL player training next to a cardiac patient. The point is scaleability.
3. If you read the note to Rayme and the email I sent both of them today, then it will become a lot clearer. Basically, why were are different.
4. Concur (50%). Part time does not lead to non-professional. Think of it like this: Do you want to go to the doctor who moonlights from his day job as an accountant? Can a part time professional be as good as a full time?
5. Concur - Partially: There have been a few referrals, however, 90% of the people have been referred from people within the classes.
6. Do not concur. We include in our programming all ten elements of fitness which is all inclusive. The curve of what is included is
7. Funny. It was called HissyFit the other day. I thought that was funny too. I will take it under consideration. How about just changing the name to "what you can't get at Globo Gym?"

Final point: Yes. As a matter of integrity, yup. Maybe it could have been posted in a different format. Maybe it was a bad call. If I were to remove it, I would be a coward and make me someone who's opinion can be changed on a whim. Then I would stand for nothing. So it stays.

This post servers another, less clear goal. There have been some accusations that I am recruiting people way from @#$$%%@. I want it to be very clear that the standards are hope we operate are not subject to populartiy contest typical in the gym industry.

Please review the physical standards we are requiring of our instructors. Albeit, the standard are relatively low, they are still standards.

Bob said...

(I will try to refrain from the typical ad hom argument to people’s integrity as best I can.)

You know, such self-serving mudslinging is generally not the mark of professional and "educated" people. For someone who throws that term around is such an insulting way, you don’t evidence much of it your self. You response to these posts and to the original letter are exactly the type of thing that labels people who work in the personal and individual fitness fields as meat heads who didn’t have what it takes to finish school. This is not an insult thrown at you; it is a statement of observation.

I should hope that all this bluster is a thinly veiled attempt at publicity.

In your original response, you paint the picture (that was accurately identified by the previous poster as a sweeping generalization) that the only people who attend group fitness classes in “other” health clubs are “uneducated” people who do not care about their well being or fitness level. You also state that:

“They were having fun dancing around to the same sorority music after 7 seven months with no visible results. (Asses the same size with no appreciable change in "body tone.")

However, you contradict this statement with this:

“What are the results given and how are they measured? We do not focus on the appearance of fitness, but in actual human output. A "six pack" is not what we are doing. It is a byproduct but is not the measure of effectiveness. We teach people to move better. We time, measure and rank EVERY workout. We judge the workout based on the output of the participants. In my opinion, this is the greatest contribution of CrossFit to our training. It provides an OBJECTIVE standard to evaluate performance.”

Which is it? Do you expect for a generally unfit person who is perhaps starting to work out for the first time in their lives, to show visible signs of body/fat ratio improvement, higher cardio vascular endurance, and muscle tone increases in seven months of working out 2 maybe 3 hours a week? If you do, you have some biology to read up on. Or is this just an example of a double standard you hold, you will judge your own participants on individual and scaled performance scales but not other programs. Extremely unprofessional manner of conducting business, in my opinion.

Lets go through your conclusions point by point and see how much water they really hold.
“1.Most fitness consumers are not really interested in results (Why would they be a part of programs that fail miserably?)
2. The typical fitness consumer does not value their fitness (Why would they accept lack of results? The entitlement attitude that they should get everything included in their membership for $40 per month when dinner and drinks is $200 for an evening)
3. Generally consumers who are uneducated are willing to accept inferior products (Does this need comment?)”

1. You don’t define “results” nor do you attempt to create any type of objective criteria for the baseless assertion in 1. Results will be individual, diverse, and of differing degrees. An 80-year-old woman will have to work extremely hard to simply maintain, while a 16-year-old male can work at 30-40% and see vast improvement. Is it fair to compare these two clients by saying that the elderly woman is not interested in results because she chooses more fun oriented and less physically testing classes? No, it is not. But this is effectively what you have done in this statement.
2. This is a completely subjective and unknowable assertion. One cannot know, by any measure, the motivations, concerns or thought processes in a given individual without expressly asking them. Your conclusion is the very definition of generalization.
3. Again, your use of vague definition (namely “ inferior” and “uneducated”) and rather insulting terminology is shameful lack of decorum for what appears to be self-serving ends. Really, did you actually think that this was not offensive, not to mention terrible logic. The goals of yoga are different from Pilates, are different from martial art, are different from spinning, etc. etc. One can only judge so-called inferiority if there are objective or explicit parameters for a type of exercise or activity. And then only a specific type can be judged. Labeling all group fitness classes that do not conform to your particular criteria as inferior is like saying that the baseball team that looses is unfit, out of shape, and should no longer be playing the game.


Now, I am sure (well I hope) this was not your intended idea or the ones that you really subscribe to, but rather a reactionary retort for effect. These point also link up with your statement “Let's face it, if "traditional" group exercise worked, then the military would adopt it and use it to train their people to prepare them for the greatest contest know to man: War.” This is just a ridiculous statement on so many levels it is hard to know where to start. Suffice it to say that it is akin to saying “If Toyotas were really effective cars, they would race them in the indy500.”


I’ll wrap this up as it is far too long winded. But as a matter of example I shall meet our challenge: “I reissue a challenge: If you can show me fitter people, show us. We will train with them.” So, check these guys out and go train with them. http://www.wushucentral.com/videos/search.php?search=Beijing+practice (Beijing Wushu team) or even these people:
http://www.usa-gymnastics.org/

It is fine to market to a niche. You serve a niche and I’m sure you are successful doing it. But it is unnecessary, uncalled for, and generally uncouth to market your program by claims of inferiority of other programs whose goals are different. As a professional I would have assume this would be a matter of course.

ec said...

doug can answer on his own - but this comment struck me.

"Do you expect for a generally unfit person who is perhaps starting to work out for the first time in their lives, to show visible signs of body/fat ratio improvement, higher cardio vascular endurance, and muscle tone increases in seven months of working out 2 maybe 3 hours a week? If you do, you have some biology to read up on."

following the crossfit/hyperfit regime - i would say yes. their results are unmatched. "results" being power output of particpants (force*distance/time), not a six pack. increasing power, which is the best individual metric of relative performance, is the goal. i would estimate an individual's power output across weeks of certain group ex classes is relatively static in comparison to that in weeks of crossfit/hyperfit. the body/fat, cardio endurance, improved muscle tone, come with increased power.

his open invitation stands.

another instructor said...

Wow Bob
No sycophant you!!

You stated my concern far better than I did.

I think we agree that, yes, there IS room for HyperFit/CrossFit but there is absolutely no reason to wrangle over clientele or denigrate one format to elevate another. We know that ultimately, that will result in less, not greater success
So, in a nutshell Mr Chapman, adopt more sportsmanlike conduct and best wishes for your success. Enough said.

David said...

Doug, you are really taking far too narrow a view of fitness and you are doing a disservice to others.

I don't doubt that people see results from your class. But if you limit the definition of results to "what you get from Boot Camp" then you're just talking in circles.

For example: I could be completely wrong about this, but I am pretty confident that if you set foot in a Step class you would be stumbling around for most of the hour like you had some traumatic head injury. But if you devoted yourself to it and put in the effort required, your coordination would improve. You would see results.

Same thing with Yoga. An inflexible person doesn't take yoga to improve their bench press. But after a time, the person's flexibility would improve. They would see results.

Note: those are two aspects of fitness that, as far as I can see, get virtually no attention in your class -- Coordination and Flexibility.

To see results in your class, or any class, you need to put in a lot of effort. You are correct that just keeping in your workout comfort zone will produce no results. That applies to your class also. Believe it or not, people do occasionally go on cruise control in your class too (I have seen it). I think you are way off in suggesting that your class is for people who want results and other classes are for those who don't care.

With respect to "A", and your standard requirements for an instructor, again, I think you are being too narrow-minded.

First, I have been taking Boot Camp classes since you were using a fake ID. Your implication that you developed something that "A" took with her is a little over the top. Every Boot Camp class I have ever taken (including yours) has had two major components -- plyometric/explosiveness drills and usable strength training. There is nothing *new* here.

Second, I have taken many Boot Camp classes from "A" and, although they are of a different flavor, they are at least as challenging as yours (crudely put, I define a challenging Boot Camp class as one that makes me feel like I am going to throw up). "A" has a lot to offer in the Boot Camp format and if your rigid standards are depriving your students of that experience, you should rethink them.

Blair Sutton said...

I’m glad to see such a lively debate going on here. It is rare to see fitness and fitness structure being debated with such passion. I would like to preface my comments by saying that I have worked in the fitness industry and engaged in classes ranging from Pilates, personal training, yoga, weightlifting, kickboxing, and spinning to Crossfit and HyperfitUSA bootcamp. That being said, I’d like to provide my own perspective on bootcamp and HyperfitUSA.

I do not think that the post was intended to be a publicity stunt. Doug posts information that he feels is relevant to the classes and its participants. In this case he was defining exactly what HyperfitUSA needs in an instructor and why he needs those qualifications need to be met. While terminology can be debated all day, I think the core message would have still been the same and somewhat less effective had it been sugar coated with multi-syllabic niceties.

The topic of education seems to be disputed here. I have met and worked with a variety of fitness consumers. I do not think that our group members are somehow more educated than other fitness consumers but I do believe that they adhere to a different set of fitness standards. Many of the people I worked with who were joining or active gym members either wanted to lose weight or gain muscle tone and definition. The mirror and the scale (and often bench-press) were the tools by which fitness was being measured.

HyperfitUSA clients may come into classes with these same ideas about the classes, and losing weight and gaining muscle mass are two of the benefits of the class. However, those who stay in the classes and are regular participants recognize that it is about developing your own personal inner athlete. The inner athlete for me may not be the same as it is for you as it is for someone twice my age. HyperfitUSA encourages clients to examine their own levels of fitness and push themselves to improve. Because of this we don’t need to wrangle or browbeat clients into showing up. Those who come and participate will recognize the benefits of the class and choose to stay or leave. While not all potential clients have the dedication or determination to stay, all of them have the mental capacity to understand what we do.

Having said all this I think the HyperfitUSA client is:
1. Determined and self-confident
2. Values a comprehensive fitness program
3. Values their time and has a desire to exercise efficiently and effectively
4. Examines their own strengths and weaknesses and seeks to improve themselves
5. Knows that fitness is not about the latest trend but about living a healthy and active lifestyle

Doug- keep up the good work and don’t worry about using overly flowery language to express yourself. The truth can be painful but that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be stated.

As for me I have found what works and I will continue to work as hard as I can to develop my own inner athlete. Real women not only have brains, but they also have muscles.

Doug Chapman said...

This is the most fun I have had in a while.

We have had a lot of hits on the blog today. It didn’t start out as a “publicity stunt” but it is a great idea.

I will have press release done about the Hyperfit USA Instructor Challenge. A really cool way of doing it would be for each instructor to put their best workout into a hopper and have the event randomly drawn out. Each workout should be performance driven and measurable as to time or scoring method. 10 events scored 10 for 1st, 9 for second and so forth. High score wins.

It is pretty cool that all these "interested" are offended I place physical standards for my prospective staff as well as classes that are based on content vs personality. I didn’t know my opinions would case such drama in our local small town market. Cool. How many of you had been on this blog before today?

Notice, I post my workouts out here in the public forum. Do any of you? (CrossFitters accepted) Do you normally post your opinions in the public space of cyberspace?

The challenge for my staff is still out there:

10 Pull Ups
2 minute rest
10 Ring Dips
2 minute rest
Hand stand (No time)
2 minute rest
100% Body weight back squats
2 minute rest
2 mile run in less than 16:00

August 5th, 2006 1200: Who measures up? Any takers? Anyone, Bueller?

David: Fake ID: That was a long time ago!  Please drop into one of my classes and try it. There is a lot of coordination and flexibility. There is no question “A” is one of the best instructors out there. My position has always been: She is worth A LOT more than what typical group exercise instructors are paid.

Bob: EC has a great point, I await your answer.

Blair Sutton said...

Doug, the challenge sounds like a brilliant idea. To all the skeptics; I'd have a hard time taking a class and pushing myself with an instructor who can't even demonstrate all of the exercises. Bootcamp requires fitter instructors because it caters to fitter clients.

Raymee said...

A highly entertaining Monday morning/afternoon indeed. Doug, although I have yet to partake in a snort of your Kool Aide (still looking forward to it actually) Clay and I have been referring our members to your website since our gym on the east side opened in February. And as of 11:25 PM last night, I have apparently marketed your blogspot pretty effectively as well. Aside from ring dips, pull-ups, and six packs (all very hot, yeah baby) my only point was, hey man where is the love? Let's respect our fellow group ex'ers regardless of whether or not we necessarily agree with their methods. Personally, the only measurement I take of my students is the size of their smiles as they walk out the door.. we all go home happy and feeling great! There is a market for that "result".. this I can assure. Ladies and gentlement, can we support each other in a public forum rather than rip on each other and compete for Last Group Fitness Instructor Standing? Lest we all forget to play not simply to win, but for the love of the game. The winning shall follow.

another instructor said...

I recognize your desire to move away from the situation which originally started this whole diatribe, and throwing down the fitness gauntlet is a rather nice diversion.

While I speak only for myself, I would guess that some of us who have corresponded with you today are less interested in the mechanics, or the
'challenge' of your format, and more interested in whether you might have arrived at the idea that bashing other programs or methods of fitness does not in any way elevate your program's status in the fitness community. Sounds like David has been one of your clients, and is not entirely satisfied with your treatment of 'A' in particular, or group fitness programs in general.

Any business is built not just upon skill, but also, and perhaps more importantly upon the goodwill of your clients and peers. Sometimes an acknowledgement of less than perfect judgment goes much farther toward mending bridges than any justification or diversion ever could.

As to 'A' being worth "more than what most typical group instructors get paid", perhaps she values respect over money. She really is one of the best instructors that I have ever seen - her classes are popular because of the skill and organization that she brings into them (SKILL not personality) and I sincerely hope that you have found it within you to apologize to 'A', for conduct unbecoming. While I may not agree with the standards to which you wish to hold your instructors,they are, of course, yours to use. I care far less about that than I do about your having breached 'A''s trust and privacy by posting your 'rant' without her knowledge or consent, and also without her original email to you, which I might add, had absolutely nothing to do with your posted response.

Ultimately, you will either decide that what we've said has some merit, or you will insulate yourself and assume that we are nuts. I have appreciated the opportunity to voice my concerns,and again wish you luck.

erikhaha said...

Waaaa, waaaaa. Stop your crying. I served with Doug in the military and he is a no nonsense straight foreward type of guy. He will tell it like it is and you can accept it or lie to yourself and give your ego a nice warm fuzzy feeling that many of you Yuppie types need.

Doug does not say stuff just to get a rise out of people, he speaks his mind without fear of judgement. Maybe some of you spineless wastes of skin should step up to the plate.

Erik

Andrea said...

I'm not quite sure how to respond to Doug's e-mail he sent to me. I am the "A" he refers to in blog rant. What he posted was a response to an e-mail I sent him. I believe it's time that you know what caused his rant. My e-mail was written as follows: And I quote.........
"Douglas,
WOW!!!!!! I believe I could meet 1/2 of the requirements . Don't forget however, being a good instructor is not just about how strong he/she is, it's about the person's ability to motivate and communicate effectively. Half the reason why you are so successful is your personality and your ability to motivate.
"With that said, I am willing to work with you ti meet the requirements you've established for your employess (once you've opened your facility).
I'm glad you finally have your own place. I know you and your programs will be very successful and I'm excited for you--very cool, you have a new business and a new a baby. 2006 is turning out to be a great year for you. Let's talk soon. Your buddy, Andrea"
(end quote)

The rant Doug posted is the personal e-mail response he sent me. I'm not sure which parts of my e-mail prompted his venom. Was it the "I'm excited for you" part or was it the comment regarding "personality and ability to motivate".
I was one of Doug's biggest supporter's. Many of his client's were refered by me. I found out about him posting our personal correspondence from one of his client's. I was horrified. The e-mail alone was insulting enough!One a different note......
I have been a group fitness instructor for 16 years. I'm also a Registered Occupational Therapist. My training in college included but was not limited to Gross Anatomy, excercise Physiololgy and 6 months of full time clinicals in Mental and Physical rehabilitation. I worked full time in a community Hospital treating patients who suffered from aputations, CVA's, and spinal injuries (and other various disorders). I believe my qualifications speak for themselves.
One final thought....Not all good fitness professionals can continue to perform at such high levels. We do age. For instance, the head coach of a Pro football team probably cannot perform the athletics of his players,however, if he communicates well and is a good leader he will have a winning team..........Andrea

Doug Chapman said...

Gibbs!

Wow, that was nicer than normal. You have grown into a humanitarian. How nice.

FYI - I may be in San Diego in mid July and will be another week in SOCAL for training in August. I would love to catch up over a pint or 12. Only if you can make sure I make it home safe and we don't cross the boarder.

I will drop you a line when I have travel docs in hand.

PS: That warrant for you is taken of...

Marilyn Alderstien said...

Interesting showing of colors here. You'll betray a friend; changing the statement, " I believe I could meet 1/2 of the requirements," to read to the general public as, "She looked at the standards and felt she could not complete half of the physical requirements," What a horrible thing to do to someone to further your own odd ideas of other peoples methods.... Wow.

And what, exactly, is the "opening of the new box?" English, please.

David said...

I have taken your class. I was speaking from my experience.

Thanks for the invitation to sign up for your class again, but considering the way you treated Andrea, and assuming your infantile buddy Erik is typical of the participants, I think I'll pass.

erikhaha said...

I have never taken the class, I live in California. I was speaking from my experience with him while we were in the military together.

Doug Chapman said...

Andrea,

First, I should have changed the format to requirements. I apologize for that. (As I did earlier)

There have been some accusations that I am trying to steal instructors from various places. Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, I am discouraging people from applying unless they are certain, absolutely certain; they are willing to commit to the level of output required. I have had several instructors who have showed interest in training with us. None of which have showed up to trainer training. That was part of the fight club reference about getting on the porch.

The standards stand. This is not new news to you. We have talked about this at length. There are none of the standards you could not reach within a few weeks/months of training. If you would be willing to make that commitment, you could do it. It would be very hard to instruct someone on doing a clean or a thruster unless you can do it yourself. No amount of alphabet soup gives someone the ability to properly do a hang clean or sumo dead lift high pull. They have to be able to do it.

It was in poor taste that I posted my personal email to you. I should have recrafted it and posted it the same way I posted the physical standards. I failed sugar coating as well as spelling, what can I say? I am a knuckle dragger.

It was interesting to get all the arguments and posts. Quite a heated debate. Entertaining.

Since I have the attention of the local instructors: How about if your compensations was directly tied to your performance? If no one comes, you don’t get paid. Or if you had $1k each year in funding for continuing education? Or if you agree to teach x number of classes per month, then you can bring in as many personal training clients as you like and it is on your balance sheet as a contractor? Those are ideas I have been kicking around. Can you be as helpful as you have been critical?

At least we people know where my blog is.

Doug

another instructor said...

Sugar-coating?
Wow, nice downplay. Glad your were entertained by your own bad manners.
Given your perceived inability to grasp what actually caused this heated exchange, I, for one, am reluctant to spend time sharing compensation strategy with you.
You mightn't fully grasp those concepts either.
Suggest you look in to what a contractor vs. an employee is according to IRS guidelines.